Endoscopic Ultrasound

If you have diabetes, ask your regular doctor for diet and medication restrictions.

If you take a medication to thin your blood and have not already discussed this with our office, please call us at 916-965-9650.

If you are or may be pregnant, please discuss the risks and benefits of this procedure with your doctor.

You must arrange for a ride for the day of your exam. If you fail to arrange transportation with a responsible adult, your procedure will need to be cancelled and rescheduled.

If you must cancel or reschedule your appointment, please call 916-965-9650 as soon as possible.

PREPARATION

To ensure a successful exam, please follow all instructions carefully. FOR EUS OF THE UPPER GI TRACT The
night before your exam:

  • Stop eating solid foods at
    11:45pm
    .
  • Clear liquids are okay
    to drink (examples: water, Gatorade, clear broth and apple
    juice).
  • Do not drink red liquids or alcoholic
    beverages.

The day of your
exam:

  • Stop drinking clear
    liquids 6 hours before your exam.
  • You may take
    your usual medications with 4 oz. of water at least 2 hours prior
    to your procedure.

When you
leave for the procedure:

  • Bring
    a list of all of your current medications, including any allergy or
    over-the-counter medications.
  • Bring a photo ID
    as well as up-to-date insurance information, such as your insurance
    card and any referral forms that might be required by your
    payer.
  • Co-pays are required on the day of your
    appointment.

FOR EUS OF THE LOWER
GI TRACT

Before your exam:
Purchase the following over-the-counter supplies at
your local pharmacy:
• 2 Fleet® enemas
The day of your exam: • There are no
dietary restrictions. 1 ½ hours before
leaving for your exam: • Rectally administer the first Fleet®
enema. 1 hour before leaving for your
exam: • Rectally administer the second Fleet® enema.
When you leave for your exam:

  • Bring a list of all of your current
    medications, including any allergy or over-the-counter
    medications.
  • Bring a photo ID as well as
    up-to-date insurance information, such as your insurance card and
    any referral forms that might be required by your payer.
  • Co-pays are required on the day of your
    appointment.

DESCRIPTION OF
ENDOSCOPIC ULTRASOUND

What is endoscopic
ultrasound (EUS)?
Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) allows
your doctor to examine the lining and the walls of your upper or
lower gastrointestinal (GI) tract. The upper tract is the
esophagus, stomach and duodenum; the lower tract includes your
colon and rectum. EUS is also used to study internal organs that
lie next to the gastrointestinal tract, such as the gall bladder
and pancreas. Your doctor will use a thin, flexible tube called an
endoscope that he or she will pass through your mouth or anus to
the area to be examined. Your doctor then will turn on the
ultrasound component to produce sound waves that create visual
images of the digestive tract. EUS provides detailed pictures of
your digestive tract anatomy. EUS may be used to diagnose the cause
of conditions such as abdominal pain or abnormal weight loss. EUS
is also used to evaluate an abnormality, such as a growth, that was
detected at a prior endoscopy or by x-ray. In addition, EUS can be
used to diagnose diseases of the pancreas, bile duct and
gallbladder when other tests are inconclusive. What
can I expect during EUS?
EUS of the
Upper GI Tract
For EUS of the upper GI tract, you
will be given medication at the beginning of the exam to help you
relax and minimize discomfort or gagging. This medication will make
you drowsy. The doctor will insert an endoscope into your mouth and
will advance it slowly through the esophagus, stomach and duodenum
(the first part of your small intestine). The actual examination
generally takes between 30 -60 minutes. Most patients consider it
only slightly uncomfortable and may fall asleep during it. If
abnormal tissue is found, the doctor may remove it through the
endoscope for closer examination or biopsy. EUS of
the Lower GI Tract
EUS examination of the lower GI
tract can often be performed safely and comfortably without
medications, but you will probably receive a sedative if the
examination will be prolonged or if the doctor will examine a
significant distance into the colon. You will start by lying on
your left side and your doctor will inert an endoscope into the
rectum and lower portion of the colon. Most EUS examinations of the
lower GI tract last about 30 minutes. If abnormal tissue is found,
the doctor may remove it through the endoscope for closer
examination or biopsy. What are the possible
complications of EUS?
Although serious complications
from EUS are rare, any medical procedure has the potential for
risks. There is a slight risk of infection if fluid is removed from
any cysts and antibiotics may be given as a preventative measure.
Other risks include:

  • Perforation, or a tear,
    of the lining of the stomach, esophagus, colon or rectum
  • Bleeding from the biopsy site, if any tissue was
    removed
  • Reaction to medications used for the
    procedure

A nurse will review all potential
warning signs with you before you leave the endoscopy center. The
risk of complications slightly increases if a deep needle
aspiration is performed during the EUS examination. There is also a
small risk of infection if fluid is removed from any cysts, and
antibiotics may be given to prevent this. These risks must be
balanced against the potential benefits of the procedure and the
risks of alternative approaches to the condition.